Category Archives: Press Release

Community Celebration Marks Completion Of Highway 4 Widening Projects

July 20, 2016
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Linsey Willis
Director of External Affairs, CCTA
925-256-4728
lwillis@ccta.net

Antioch, CA – A community celebration and ribbon cutting this morning marked the completion of the Highway 4 Widening Projects, a six-year-long collaborative endeavor by the Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA), the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART), the Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the California Transportation Commission and the Federal Highway Administration.

Highway 4, an important artery spanning nearly all of Contra Costa County, was for years one of the worst commutes in the Bay Area. The Highway 4 Widening Projects include improvements that expand Highway 4 from four to eight lanes between Loveridge Road in Pittsburg to just west of State Route 160 in Antioch and from two to four lanes from Lone Tree Way to Balfour Road in Brentwood. The projects also added missing connector ramps at the State Route 160/Highway 4 interchange and will add a BART extension from Pittsburg to Antioch. This will greatly improve transit accessibility for the region, help reduce traffic congestion and enhance the quality of life for the more than 250,000 residents of eastern Contra Costa County.

Download video clips of these projects – including a stunning time-lapse film – here.

CCTA funded more than a quarter of the project ($362 million) through Measure J, a half-cent sales tax reauthorized by Contra Costa voters in 2004, and through the previous Measure C.

“The Highway 4 widening and BART extension projects would not have been possible without the support of Contra Costa voters in 2004, or without the help of partner agencies. We look forward to continued public support for additional innovations and improvements on the Highway 4 corridor in the future,” said CCTA Chair Dave Hudson. “The Contra Costa Transportation Authority’s investment in improving Highway 4 will have a ripple effect across the county and provide tangible benefits not just for East County residents, but for all travelers who live, work or drive through this corridor.”

With the exception of just one structure, the entire highway facility between Pittsburg and Brentwood was reconstructed, including 21 bridges. These projects were built to last using the latest materials, including asphalt concrete (the total weight of asphalt placed is over 228,000 tons). In addition to bringing 12,775 high-paying construction jobs to the region, the projects have laid the infrastructure for potential permanent employment centers along East County’s northern waterfront.

“We are working with regional transportation planners to plan for California’s future, including this thriving community,” said Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty. “We are committed to developing a transportation network that maximizes every dollar of investment.”

The Highway 4 Widening Projects include a median wide enough to accommodate a 10-mile BART extension from Pittsburg to Antioch. Now that all highway segments are complete, the BART line will be installed, and the BART station at Hillcrest is expected to open in the winter of 2017/2018.

“We are proud to be a partner on this important project to bring regional connectivity to East Contra Costa County,” said Joel Keller, BART District 2 Director. “The BART extension is being constructed with a new kind of train for the region, one that is 60% less costly to build than traditional BART trains.”

Members of East County’s rapidly-growing community enjoyed food and music as CCTA and its partners, joined by state, regional and local officials, cut a ceremonial ribbon on the newly-widened highway.

For additional information about the Highway 4 Corridor Projects, please visit www.4eastcounty.org.

About CCTA
The Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) is a public agency formed by Contra Costa voters in 1988 to manage the county’s transportation sales tax program and oversee countywide transportation planning efforts. CCTA is responsible for planning, funding and delivering critical transportation infrastructure projects and programs that connect our communities, foster a strong economy, increase sustainability and safely and efficiently get people where they need to go. CCTA also serves as the county’s designated Congestion Management Agency, responsible for putting programs in place to keep traffic levels manageable. More information about CCTA can be found online at ccta.net.

About the Highway 4 Corridor Projects
The Highway 4 Corridor Projects include improvements that will help modernize eastern Contra Costa County. The projects expand Highway 4 from four to eight lanes between Loveridge Road in Pittsburg to just west of State Route 160 in Antioch and from two to four lanes from Lone Tree Way to Balfour Road in Brentwood, add missing connector ramps at the State Route 160/Highway 4 interchange and add a BART extension from Pittsburg to Antioch. This will greatly improve transit accessibility for the region, help reduce traffic congestion and enhance the quality of life for the more than 250,000 residents of eastern Contra Costa County. The projects have been carefully staged to keep 130,000 vehicles per day moving as major construction and demolition work continue. These projects, plus previously constructed projects in the region, bring the total investment in East County to $1.3 billion, including State, Federal, Contra Costa Transportation Authority Measures C and J, regional bridge tolls and other funds.

State Route 160/4 Direct Connector Ramps Project Completed

February 29, 2016
For Immediate Release

Contact: Linsey Willis
Director of External Affairs, CCTA
(925) 256-4728

STATE ROUTE 160/4 DIRECT CONNECTOR RAMPS PROJECT COMPLETED

Officials Highlight Improved Regional Mobility and Congestion Relief with Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

Antioch/Oakley, CA –The Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC)/Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA), joined by state, regional, and local officials, marked the completion of work on the much-needed $50 million connection between State Route 160, the Senator John A. Nejedly Bridge (Antioch Bridge), and Highway 4 with a brief ribbon cutting ceremony this morning.

Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at State Route 160/4 Direct Connector Ramps

Agencies and state, regional, and local officials cut a ceremonial ribbon for the State Route 160/4 Direct Connector Ramps

The new ramps—one connecting westbound Highway 4 to northbound State Route 160, and one connecting southbound State Route 160 to eastbound Highway 4—eliminate the U-turn that was previously required at Hillcrest Avenue, reduce through traffic and congestion on Oakley’s city streets, and improve access for Eastern Contra Costa County.

The completed State Route 160/Highway 4 Direct Connector Ramps add an additional 12-foot auxiliary lane to State Route 160 in both directions between the State Route 160/Highway 4 Interchange and the East 18th/Main Street Interchange. The new structure crosses the median of Highway 4 at a height that can accommodate a future BART extension.

State Route 160/4 Direct Connector Ramps

State Route 160/4 Direct Connector Ramps

The project features sound wall extensions and new retaining walls in addition to the 2.62 new lane miles under construction, and was funded entirely by $50 million in Bay Area Toll Authority (BATA) Bridge Toll Funds. “MTC/BATA is proud to support these important improvements, which enhance safety and mobility for the residents and motorists of Eastern Contra Costa County,” said Federal Glover, MTC/BATA Commissioner and Contra Costa County Supervisor.

The addition of the interchange connectors is part of a massive $1.3 billion undertaking by CCTA and project partners to widen the Highway 4 corridor between Pittsburg and Antioch in eastern Contra Costa County and extend BART to Antioch. “This latest segment of the Highway 4 improvement projects is furthering our efforts to improve regional mobility, revitalize the local economy, and  improve the quality of life for 250,000 residents in East County,” said CCTA Executive Director Randell Iwasaki. “These projects are possible in large part due to the passage of a local half-cent sales tax by Contra Costa voters in 2004.”

About the Highway 4 Projects

The Highway 4 projects include improvements that will help modernize eastern Contra Costa County. The projects expand Highway 4 from four to eight lanes between Loveridge Road in Pittsburg to just west of State Route 160 in Antioch, from two to four lanes from Lone Tree Way to Sand Creek Road in Brentwood, add missing connector ramps at the State Route 160/Highway 4 interchange, and add a BART extension from Pittsburg to Antioch. This will greatly improve transit accessibility for the region, help reduce traffic congestion, and enhance the quality of life for the more than 250,000 residents of eastern Contra Costa County. The projects have been carefully staged to keep 130,000 vehicles per day moving as major construction and demolition work continue. These projects, plus previously constructed projects in the region, bring the total investment in East County to $1.3 billion, including State, Federal, Contra Costa Transportation Authority Measures C and J, regional bridge tolls, and other funds.

For additional information about Highway 4 Corridor Improvements, please visit www.4eastcounty.org.

Westbound Traffic on State Route 4 Gets Some Relief

Press Release
Westbound Traffic on State Route 4 Gets Some Relief
New lanes opened as part of the highway widening project

November 3, 2015

Contact:
Linsey Willis, Director of External Affairs, (CCTA): (925) 256-4728

Shannon Brinias, Public Information Office, (Caltrans): (510) 286-5543

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

November 3, 2015: The Highway 4 Project hit another milestone this week with the opening of two new lanes of traffic on westbound Highway 4, starting just after the Lone Tree Way/A Street undercrossing. Commuters can now travel along four lanes of highway, including a High Occupancy Vehicle lane. The project also includes newly configured on- and off-ramps from the highway to local roads.

See diagrams of the new lane segments on the Contra Loma Boulevard segment web page.

The auxiliary lane and off-ramp to Contra Loma Boulevard are not yet open, but they are expected to be open in the next week. The Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) and Caltrans are working together to complete this segment of the Highway 4 corridor project, referred to as Contra Loma Boulevard/L Street, of the highway construction project.

The purpose of the overall Highway 4 corridor project is to improve traffic flow on the highway and enhance motorist safety.

“We’re very happy to be able to open these new lanes to traffic and bring additional congestion relief to Eastern Contra Costa County,” said Ivan Ramirez, Construction Manager, CCTA. “This is the third of five segments we’ve opened to the public for the Highway 4 corridor project, and we’ll continue to work hard to finish the next two to deliver a modernized Highway 4 to the public.”

“Caltrans is glad to work with our partner in this growing community in East Contra Costa County,” said Dan McElhinney, Caltrans Chief Duputy District Director. “Anything we can do to help meet the traffic demand is beneficial for the cities along this corridor and the entire Bay Area region.”

Construction on the Contra Loma Boulevard/L Street segment began in March of 2012. The eastbound lanes for the segment are expected to open in late November or early December.

The construction budget for this segment was $48.7 million. For more information, please visit our website at www.4eastcounty.org.

About CCTA: The Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) is a public agency formed by Contra Costa voters in 1988 to manage the county’s transportation sales tax program and oversee countywide transportation planning efforts. CCTA is responsible for maintaining and improving the county’s transportation system by planning, funding and delivering critical transportation infrastructure projects and programs that connect our communities, foster a strong economy, increase sustainability, and safely and efficiently get people where they need to go. CCTA also serves as the county’s designated Congestion Management Agency, responsible for establishing programs to keep traffic levels manageable. More information about CCTA can be found online at www.ccta.net.

About Caltrans: Caltrans manages more than 50,000 miles of California’s highway and freeway lanes, provides inter-city rail services, permits more than 400 public-use airports and special-use hospital heliports, and works with local agencies. Caltrans carries out its mission of providing a safe, sustainable, integrated and efficient transportation system to enhance California’s economy and livability.

cctacaltrans

Utility Relocation Begins on Balfour Road Interchange at State Route 4

Press Release
Utility Relocation Begins on Balfour Road Interchange at State Route 4

March 26, 2015

Contact:

Linsey Willis, Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA): (925) 256-4728

Jennifer Allen, Director of Public Affairs, Contra Costa Water District (CCWD): (925) 688-8041

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

March 26, 2015: The Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA), the Contra Costa Water District (CCWD) and Caltrans are pleased to announce the start of utility relocation work at Balfour Road in Brentwood, in preparation for construction of the new Balfour Road Interchange at State Route 4.

The purpose of the upcoming construction project is to improve traffic flow on State Route 4 and enhance motorist safety. Construction on the interchange is slated to begin in late 2015 and to continue for approximately two years.

The Balfour Road project will replace the existing signalized, at-grade intersection at Balfour Road and State Route 4 with a full access-controlled, grade-separated interchange. State Route 4 will be raised to cross over Balfour Road, creating a new, safer undercrossing.

The Balfour Road Interchange project also involves the relocation of a Kinder Morgan pump station and two PG&E transmission towers to make way for new roadway elements.

“Many local and state agencies have been working together to keep this project moving forward,” said CCTA Executive Director Randell Iwasaki. “Because of this collaborative effort with CCWD and other agencies, we are able to perform this project efficiently and cost effectively.”

Last year, CCTA and CCWD worked together to gain Caltrans approval to leave the 90-inch Los Vaqueros Pipeline in place along the project alignment, and essentially to build the new highway infrastructure in conformity with the existing pipeline. The complete relocation of the pipeline would have incurred a high cost and required additional private property, time and work in environmentally-sensitive areas.

Rather than a complete relocation of the relatively new pipeline, CCTA, CCWD and Caltrans arrived at a design that maintains the reliability and longevity of the infrastructure, works for all agencies, reduces environmental and community impacts, and saves Contra Costans approximately $18 million in environmental permitting, property acquisition and construction costs.

“This project is a win-win for the people of Contra Costa County,” said CCWD Board President Joseph L. Campbell. “CCWD and CCTA worked together on a solution that resulted in significant savings without affecting this project or impacting existing or future infrastructure.”

The design for the interchange and pipeline improvements accommodate not only near-term needs, but needs well into the future.

Caltrans District Director Bijan Sartipi said, “This innovative partnering solution on Highway 4 provides the residents of Contra Costa County with several positive outcomes. It provides greater mobility for all modes of travel in the region, it lessens the footprint of this transportation improvement project within an environmentally sensitive area, and, ultimately, this project demonstrates sound financial stewardship for the taxpayers of Contra Costa County.”

Joint trenching on Balfour Road for utility relocation began in March. PG&E transmission tower relocation is anticipated to begin in April 2015. The full project is expected to take two years to complete. For more information and to track project updates, visit 4eastcounty.org.

Motorists should use caution in construction areas and follow directions from signage and flaggers.

About CCTA: The Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) is a public agency formed by Contra Costa voters in 1988 to manage the county’s transportation sales tax program and oversee countywide transportation planning efforts. CCTA is responsible for maintaining and improving the county’s transportation system by planning, funding and delivering critical transportation infrastructure projects and programs that connect our communities, foster a strong economy, increase sustainability, and safely and efficiently get people where they need to go. CCTA also serves as the county’s designated Congestion Management Agency, responsible for establishing programs to keep traffic levels manageable. More information about CCTA can be found online at www.ccta.net

About CCWD: The Contra Costa Water District (CCWD) serves treated and untreated water to approximately 500,000 people in central and eastern Contra Costa County. CCWD provides treated water to Clayton, Clyde, Concord, Pacheco, the City of Antioch and the Golden State Water Company in Bay Point. CCWD treats water at the Randall-Bold Water Treatment Plant in Oakley for delivery to the Diablo Water District (Oakley) and the City of Brentwood. CCWD sells untreated water to the cities of Antioch, Martinez and Pittsburg, and the Golden State Water Company in Brentwood, as well as 22 industrial customers.

cctaccwdcaltrans

New Lanes Open to Traffic on Highway 4

Press Release
New Lanes Open to Traffic on Highway 4

December 17, 2013

CONTACT:
Linsey Willis: Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA), (925) 256-4728

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Antioch, CA: This morning, Caltrans and the Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA) opened two additional westbound highway lanes from Contra Loma Blvd/L Street in Antioch to Loveridge Road in Pittsburg, marking a major project milestone for Highway 4 widening work between Pittsburg and Antioch.

The new westbound lanes, combined with the eastbound lanes that opened in November, provide more than 15 lane miles of additional capacity along a three-mile section of Highway 4.
CCTA is committed to bringing congestion relief to motorists and transit users as soon as possible by opening expanded highway segments along Highway 4 as they are completed. Today’s opening represents the completion of the first two segments of construction, with three more segments in progress from Contra Loma Boulevard to Hillcrest Avenue. These remaining segments are expected to be complete in late 2015. At that time, 33 miles of Highway 4 from Antioch to Hercules will have been widened from the original two lanes, a process that began in 1988 with funding from Contra Costa’s half-cent transportation sales tax measure.

“CCTA is pleased we can provide increased capacity on these segments of Highway 4 just in time for the holidays, making it easier for residents of East County to spend more time with family and friends and less time on the highway,” said Randy Iwasaki, Executive Director, CCTA.
“These new lanes add another chapter to the ongoing success story along Highway 4,” said Caltrans District 4 Director Bijan Sartipi. “Congestion is decreasing, and drivers are less frustrated by delays. In addition, the new HOV lanes offer commuters a viable option to solo driving.”

The Highway 4 corridor improvement projects will bring congestion relief and expanded public transportation access to the residents of eastern Contra Costa County through the widening of the highway from two to four lanes in each direction, including an HOV lane accessible to carpools and transit vehicles, and median widening to accommodate BART expansion (eBART).

About Highway 4 Corridor Improvements & eBART:
The Highway 4 projects include improvements that will help revitalize eastern Contra Costa County. The projects expand Highway 4 from four to eight lanes between Loveridge Road in Pittsburg to just west of State Route 160 in Antioch, from two to four lanes from Lone Tree Way to Sand Creek Road in Brentwood, add missing connector ramps at the Highway 4/State Route 160 interchange, and add a BART extension from Pittsburg to Antioch (eBART). This will greatly improve transit accessibility for the region, help reduce traffic congestion, and enhance the quality of life for the more than 250,000 residents of eastern Contra Costa County. The projects have been carefully staged to keep 130,000 vehicles per day moving as major construction and demolition work continue. These projects, plus previously constructed projects in the region, bring the total investment in East County to $1.3 billion, including State, Federal, Contra Costa Transportation Authority Measures C and J, regional bridge tolls, and other funds.

Highway 4 Transportation Improvement Projects Mark Important Milestone

Press Release
Highway 4 Transportation Improvement Projects Mark Important Milestone

CONTACTS:
Ivy Morrison: Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA): 510-333-4742
Allyn Amsk: Caltrans, District 4: 510-286-5445
Luna Salaver: Bay Area Rapid Transit District (BART): 510-874-7474

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Antioch, CA: Today the Contra Costa Transportation Authority (CCTA), the Bay Area Rapid Transit District (BART) and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 4 celebrated the start of construction on the final segment of the Highway 4 corridor projects, which includes the construction of the eBART station facilities in Antioch. This marks an important step in the $1.3 billion endeavor to improve transportation in eastern Contra Costa County between Pittsburg and Brentwood.

CCTA Executive Director Randy Iwasaki said, “The voters of Contra Costa County have shown that they value better transportation options and multimodal investments when they reauthorized a countywide half-cent sales tax measure in 2004 through Measure J. The Highway 4 projects fulfill the vision of improved mobility and transit access from eastern Contra Costa County to the greater Bay Area for the more than 250,000 residents of eastern Contra Costa County.”

“For many years, residents of East County, one of the fastest-growing areas of the Bay Area, have been paying to support BART while dealing with some of the worst traffic in the area,” said Joel Keller, BART Director. “The eBART extension addresses this need. Additionally, not only does the construction phase create jobs, eBART will bring jobs to East County, and greatly increase access to jobs throughout the Bay Area for East County residents. As part of BART’s commitment to the community, we have established a Local Hire program for eBART construction contracts, and are participating in the Helmets to Hardhats effort to employ veterans returning from service.”

“Caltrans worked very closely with our local partners to develop these vital transportation projects,” said Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty. “Everyone will benefit when our work is done – commuters, businesses, and local residents.”

About State Route 4 Corridor Improvements & eBART:
The Highway 4 projects include improvements to the entire project corridor that will help revitalize eastern Contra Costa County. The projects expand Highway 4 from four to eight lanes between Loveridge Road in Pittsburg to Hillcrest Avenue in Antioch and to six lanes from Hillcrest to State Route 160; the projects also add a BART extension from Pittsburg to Antioch (eBART). This will greatly improve transit accessibility for the region and help reduce traffic congestion and enhance the quality of life for the more than 250,000 residents of eastern Contra Costa County. The projects have been carefully staged to keep 130,000 vehicles per day moving as major construction and demolition work continue, and include over $1.3 billion in State, Federal, Regional Bridge Toll and Contra Costa Measures C & J sales tax.

The eBART line will use DMU (diesel multiple-unit) trains, which are smaller than standard BART trains. They will enable East County residents to board a train at the Antioch Station and arrive at Pittsburg/Bay Point BART in 10 minutes. The DMU train was chosen to bring BART-quality rail service to East County at a lower cost than conventional BART. The line is slated to begin service in 2017.